Columbus

April 17-May 8, 2024

Events / GiveBackHack Columbus Spring 2024

Overview

Format Overview: Spread across 4 weeks, this event will consist of weekly 2-hour workshops tailored to guide you through the stages of idea validation, prototyping, business model development, and impact model development.

Who is this for? Whether you’re nurturing a brand-new concept for a social enterprise or seeking to integrate a new offering into your existing business, this program is tailor-made for individuals like you who want to build social impact solutions with the help of community.

Key Topics: Over the course of the program, we’ll delve into key aspects of your venture, from validating your idea’s potential to crafting a solid business model. Each session will provide invaluable insights and practical tools to propel your idea forward. We are facilitators, not lecturers. Our joint sessions will be action-oriented and supported by community mentors.

Community Engagement: As part of this cohort, you’ll have the opportunity to participate in a GiveBackHack Community Night. Here, you’ll showcase your progress, gather feedback, and further engage with the public to validate your ideas. The program will culminate in a tabling day where you’ll present your refined concepts to a broader audience.


Schedule

Wednesday April 17

6:00pm
Week 1: Validation

Wednesday April 24

6:00pm
Week 2: Prototyping

Thursday April 25

6:00pm
Community Night @ Third Way!! (Public Event)

Wednesday May 1

6:00pm
Week 3: Business Model + Impact Model

Wednesday May 8

6:00pm
Week 4: Next Steps + Storytelling

Thursday May 9

6:00pm
Launch Party!! (Public Event)

Mentors

Lachandra Baker

Founder and Principal Consultant at LBB Edutainment

Lachandra B. Baker, MBA, CDP (she/her) is Founder and Principal Consultant at LBB Edutainment, a consultancy specializing in the development of strategies that improve and positively impact employee engagement, communications, culture, and diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging. She received her bachelor’s degree from Central Washington University, majoring in Hospitality Management and ... Read More »


Event Sponsors


Facilitators

Adam is a co-founder of Wild Tiger Tees, a budding social enterprise work program for youth experiencing homelessness. (Which started as a GiveBackHack project in 2018!) He is passionate about inspiring others to get involved, and hosts the People Helping People Podcast to inspire greater social change in the world. By day, he utilizes his technology background as the CTO for Asset Strategy Group, where ... Read More »

Emily is a Design Thinking practitioner by day and a Social Innovation enthusiast by night. She spends her time building the social impact launchpad at GiveBackHack, coaching social entrepreneurs, and empowering communities through Design Thinking facilitation. She is passionate about leveraging systems thinking to build sustainable social solutions, creating true social impact in our communities. Previously ... Read More »


Organizers

Adam is a co-founder of Wild Tiger Tees, a budding social enterprise work program for youth experiencing homelessness. (Which started as a GiveBackHack project in 2018!) He is passionate about inspiring others to get involved, and hosts the People Helping People Podcast to inspire greater social change in the world. By day, he utilizes his technology background as the CTO for Asset Strategy Group, where ... Read More »

Clayton is a versatile professional with a background spanning hospitality, tech, real estate, and finance. His career journey began in hospitality, where he honed his customer-centric approach, and he transitioned into the tech startup ecosystem, igniting his passion for innovation and entrepreneurship. In real estate and finance, Clayton excelled in strategic thinking and risk management. However, ... Read More »

Emily is a Design Thinking practitioner by day and a Social Innovation enthusiast by night. She spends her time building the social impact launchpad at GiveBackHack, coaching social entrepreneurs, and empowering communities through Design Thinking facilitation. She is passionate about leveraging systems thinking to build sustainable social solutions, creating true social impact in our communities. Previously ... Read More »

Grant loves applying his skills to create a positive impact in the Columbus community. He is inspired by the ideas brought forth at GiveBackHack, and hopes he can help bring them to fruition!  In his spare time, he enjoys music, watches sports (especially Ohio State football), goes bike riding, and plays soccer.

Jack Demos is a dedicated professional with a rich and varied background, driven by a profound commitment to effecting positive change. Graduating with honors (Magna cum laude) from The Ohio State University, he earned a B.S. in Political Science and Government, which served as a strong foundation for his multifaceted journey. His leadership acumen is exemplified through his role as President of the ... Read More »

Lydia is the senior graphic designer at AndHealth and has over 10 years of experience working with nonprofits, social enterprises, and startups. She is on the boards for the Columbus Center for Architecture and Design (CFAD) and Columbus Society of Communicating Arts (CSCA).

Max is a Software Engineer living in Columbus. He is thrilled by watching people drive to make great ideas a reality, especially when they are focused around compassion and community. He loves the outdoors and music.

Hey, I'm Owen. I like to work on projects that help people relate to the world in new ways. I am the founder of TeachTo, where I recruited and led team using neuroscience research to help teachers improve intervention documentation. Wrote and presented pitch to secure $10K in prizes. Validated no-tech prototype with 30+ educators leading to 21 LOIs; used this data to report to funders. I also ... Read More »

Rachyl founded @greatercolumbusconsulting from her passion for helping small local businesses succeed. Rachyl is a lifelong Buckeye, with a degree from The Ohio State University, and 20 years of business experience in central Ohio. She has assisted executive teams in securing over $65M in funding, as well as helping businesses of all sizes create strategic goals that are realistic based on their past ... Read More »


Pre-submitted Ideas

Submit your Idea 

  • 1. Kind Counsel Collective submitted by Mindy Yocum

    Kind Counsel CollectiveSubmitted by Mindy Yocum


    What is the problem are you solving?

    Law school does not teach attorneys how to practice law- and this is a detriment to attorneys, clients, and the legal system.


    How will this idea solve the problem?

    Kind Counsel Collective is engineered to be a comprehensive support system for new and solo attorneys. At its core, it offers easy access to a curated library of practical legal resources, a mentorship program with seasoned lawyers, and a vibrant community forum. This is designed to not just ease the transition from law school to practice but to redefine it, making it more integrated, supportive, and efficient. We are improving the legal system from the inside out.
    Kind Counsel Collective stands out because it’s not just another legal resource platform; it’s a community-driven ecosystem. By integrating educational content with real-world advice and peer support, it addresses the multifaceted challenges faced by new and solo attorneys. This holistic approach ensures members not only find what they need but also what they didn’t know they needed, fostering growth, confidence, and a progressive legal mindset.


    Is this idea brand new or has it been partially-vetted?

    Partially-vetted


    How you have vetted your idea and the success or difficulties you have seen thus far?

    We’re on the brink of launching Kind Counsel Collective for beta testing, with a specific niche audience comprised of law grads, just passing the bar exam. I have been working on the idea for awhile, and different iterations, but I really gained momentum during my stint on "The Blox," a reality show that educates entrepreneurs. That experience sharpened my focus and confirmed there’s a real need for a platform like ours. Right now, we’re deep into building this platform (which is a huge learning experience) and curating content that speaks directly to the challenges and ambitions of newly barred attorneys. As I work on the content- I am looking for like-minded attorneys to provide resources and mentorship- I have gotten a lot of interest and excellent feedback- but I am struggling with the best way to monetize the platform.


    Why are YOU uniquely positioned to solve the problem? What other people do you need to help?

    My unique blend of experiences, from navigating the early stages of legal practice myself, to serving 1000s of people who don't typically have access to legal resources, and even my background in hospitality, equip me with a deep understanding of the challenges faced by new and solo attorneys. My journey has instilled me with a mix of empathy, practical knowledge, and the drive to innovate. I’ve lived the problem we’re solving.

  • 2. VOICe: Vocalize Online Interpretation Course submitted by Laney King

    VOICe: Vocalize Online Interpretation CourseSubmitted by Laney King


    What is the problem are you solving?

    We are looking to solve the impact of language barriers on patient outcomes. Free and charitable clinics cannot afford expensive interpretation services. This leads to healthcare being provided through charts or even using Google translate. At Vocalize, we believe that every patient deserves a quality healthcare experience, regardless of their English speaking abilities.


    How will this idea solve the problem?

    The creation of VOICe will allow us to recruit and train volunteers on a larger scale. The more interpreters we have the more clinics and patients we will be able to meet.


    Is this idea brand new or has it been partially-vetted?

    Partially-vetted


    How you have vetted your idea and the success or difficulties you have seen thus far?

    Currently, Vocalize subsidizes our volunteer interpretation training through external programs, such as the Community Interpreter. Utilizing this model of training, Vocalize has trained over 80 interpreters and provided over $300,000 worth of free interpretation services to our 4 partner clinics. Therefore, we know that our scheduling mechanism and web app successfully connect interpreters and clinics. However, subsidizing training is expensive and presents difficulties when it comes to growth. At present, Vocalize relies on grant funding to be able to do this. This is where VOICe comes in. Vocalize is in the process of created an online, asynchronous interpretation course. Our project manager, Paloma Pinillos, is an expert in course development and interpretation training. We have leveraged our connections with several experts in course development, language education, and advocacy in interpretation to validate the need and format of our course.


    Why are YOU uniquely positioned to solve the problem? What other people do you need to help?

    Vocalize is a diverse team of dedicated students. Two of our founders, Joe Ziegler and Lia Gomez-Perez, both immigrated to the US at a young age and had to learn English. They understand what it means to have a language barrier. As for me, I am a double major in Spanish and Philosophy, Politics, and Economics. As I attempt to learn a second language, I understand the anxieties that are involved in communicating in your second language. This is exacerbated by experiences in a doctor's office where an individual is not heard or understood. I am passionate about a commitment to providing every member of our society with the care they deserve.

  • 3. TeachTo submitted by Owen Myers

    TeachToSubmitted by Owen Myers


    What is the problem are you solving?

    Special education teachers spend hours of unpaid time working on individualized education plans (IEPs). While they're important, each IEP takes between one and three hours to write. Many teachers have case loads of 20+ IEPs each year, plus amendments.


    How will this idea solve the problem?

    TeachTo alleviates teachers' time spent on the most cognitively laborious task of writing IEPs: thinking of goals. It uses generative artificial intelligence (GenAI) to suggest goals based on simple, non-identifying facts of the student's situation. This saves teachers time and energy spent thinking of and writing goals from scratch.


    Is this idea brand new or has it been partially-vetted?

    Partially-vetted


    How you have vetted your idea and the success or difficulties you have seen thus far?

    Been working on this one for almost three years. V1 has been tested with nearly 20 teachers—feedback was generally positive. Problem is palpable, but scaling and distribution in such a niche and saturated market will be challenging.


    Why are YOU uniquely positioned to solve the problem? What other people do you need to help?

    I've been working on this problem for three years! Work with social enterprises and education-adjacent organizations.

  • 4. Astra Impact: A Design Access Program submitted by Amanda Dunfield

    Astra Impact: A Design Access ProgramSubmitted by Amanda Dunfield


    What is the problem are you solving?

    Design is powerful.
    Imagine if that power was put in the hands of those creating a better future; how much further would they be able to go?
    Creating access to design services will help the people who are already working so hard for social change to achieve their missions - improving the lives of people, communities and the planet.

    This is grassroots design activism. Empowering designers to be activists who are empower activists with design!


    How will this idea solve the problem?

    The Astra Impact fund will help broaden who can have access to design while offsetting their costs for those design services. This means that the design studio can ensure its financial sustainability and viability while providing the same level of design excellence to fund recipients as fully paying clients; the design studio can do as many of these projects as the fund will provide funding for instead of internally subsidizing these projects. The design studio has provided over $60,000 of design services to social impact organizations since 2021. The Astra Impact fund will not stop the internal subsidizing of worthy projects but rather will broaden how many Impact Projects we can support.


    Is this idea brand new or has it been partially-vetted?

    Partially-vetted


    How you have vetted your idea and the success or difficulties you have seen thus far?

    I have been working with Cause Impact to structure the program. I need help figuring out the impact metrics, how I should be fund raising for the fund and how we get this thing moving already because the need is so great!

    The fund is established at the United Way. The structure is in place we just need money now, the metrics to track and the volunteers for the review committee to allocate the funds to projects.


    Why are YOU uniquely positioned to solve the problem? What other people do you need to help?

    I am a licensed architect. I am a strategic problem solver. I care deeply about design. But what drives me is to find a way to use design for the greater good - in a real and meaningful way. To use design as a tool for healing, inclusion, equity, and resiliency.

    I have built Astra Studios with this mission at its core. I know the need exists, now we just need the fund funded to prove the kinds of impacts design can have for these Impact organizations.